Trailblazer for path to Black leadership in the trades dies

Source: US International Brotherhood of Boilermakers

It is with great sadness that the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers has learned about the death of Edward Powers, who, in addition to his dedication as a shipyard Boilermaker, rose as a leader and worked to create pathways to advance Black Boilermakers into leadership roles. Brother Powers was 88 years old.

Powers, who retired from Electric Boat in 1992 after 40 years of service, began his career working on the USS Nautilus and quickly proved himself as a visionary leader on the job. He was a steward and lodge officer at Local 614 (Groton, Connecticut) and attracted the interest of the Metal Trades Council for his forward-thinking and tenacity. The Metal Trades Council supported Powers’ efforts to establish a biracial committee to create opportunities and mentoring programs to position Black Boilermakers for supervisory roles in the trades.

As his tribute reads:

Edward applied his desire to think ‘outside of the box’ and belief that all things are possible, to strengthen his administrative skills to affect change and provide voice and opportunity for men and women of color. Edward was perhaps himself the best example of a mentor, rising through the ranks from welder to methods analyst to engineer to senior engineer. Earning engineering certification from the University of New Haven, he designed complex product prototypes for naval projects in the Washington, D.C., Newport News and San Diego shipyards and all the while, continued looking behind. Him, eager to help lift the proteges of color who admired him.

Read Brother Power’s full tribute here: https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/theday/obituary.aspx?n=edward-farnswor…

CFTC Orders Connecticut Firm to Pay $500,000 for Wash Sales

Source: US Commodity Futures Trading Commission

— The Commodity Futures Trading Commission today issued an order filing and settling charges against respondent SummerHaven Investment Management LLC, a Connecticut commodity trading advisor and commodity pool operator, for engaging in wash sales and non-competitive transactions on the InterContinental Exchange and various Chicago Mercantile Exchange exchanges, and for failing to diligently supervise its activities.

The order requires SummerHaven to pay a civil monetary penalty of $500,000 and to cease and desist from further violations of the Commodity Exchange Act and CFTC regulations, as charged.

Case Background

According to the order, SummerHaven engaged in multiple wash sales and non-competitive transactions while moving positions held by a client from one futures commission merchant (FCM) to another. Specifically, on July 2, 2018, SummerHaven placed offsetting buy and sell orders at each FCM, resulting in a series of pre-arranged offsetting trades in contracts for crude oil, heating oil, gasoil, live cattle, lean hogs, soybean meal, gasoline, cocoa, and cotton. In total, SummerHaven made more than 100 non-competitive prearranged trades with an aggregate value of more than $570 million. The order finds that SummerHaven failed in its supervisory duties because it did not have policies or procedures in place to prohibit wash sales or non-competitive transactions, and because the decision to execute wash sales and non-competitive transactions was reviewed and directed by senior supervisory management, including SummerHaven’s then-Chief Compliance Officer and then-Managing Partner.

The Division of Enforcement staff members responsible for this action are Kevin Samuel, Brian Hunt, Alison Wilson, Erica Bodin and Rick Glaser.

New CDC Report Finds More Adults Are Dying from Bicycle-Related Accidents; CPSC Says it Highlights the Importance of Helmets

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is reminding consumers of the importance of wearing helmets for sports and recreation to reduce the risk of head injury, including traumatic brain injuries (TBIs).  Helmets absorb much of the impact energy from a fall or collision, and can protect the skull and brain from more severe injury.
Bike helmets are required to meet CPSC’s federal safety standard.  They must have a label stating that they meet the standard.  Consumers can usually find this label on the liner inside of the helmet, on the exterior surface, or attached to the chin strap.  Information on bike helmets, and helmets for other activities, can be found at CPSC’s “Which Helmet for Which Activity” webpage.
Findings in a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show just how critical helmets are to preventing injuries and deaths.  The report found that from 2009 through 2018:
Bicycle-related deaths increased between 2009 and 2018, primarily among adults.
There were nearly 597,000 bicycle-related traumatic brain injuries treated in hospital emergency departments (ED) in the United States.
The rate of ED visits declined by almost 50% among kids, but declined only 6% among adults.
Males were three times more likely than females to end up in the ED with traumatic brain injuries.
Policies requiring bike helmets have been associated with long-term, sustained bike helmet use and a 20%-55% reduction in head injuries.
CPSC’s recent report on the impact of COVID-19 on hospital emergency room-treated injuries during the period March through September 2020 also highlighted the concern, finding that although bicycles had a slight increase (1%) in overall injuries, the increase jumped to 21% for users age 40 and above, and 39% for adults older than 70.  Injuries from skateboards, scooters, and hoverboards rose 39%.
Although no helmet design has been proven to prevent concussions, CDC’s HEADS UP helps identify concussion symptoms, and when to seek treatment.
To prevent sports-related head injuries, consumers should:
Always wear a helmet and other safety gear when bicycling and playing sports.
Follow manufacturer’s instructions.
Ensure the helmet fits and is worn correctly.
Replace helmets when needed.  Incidents can impact helmets, and you may not see the damage.  Cracks in the shell, worn straps, and missing pads or other parts are all reasons to replace a helmet.
Look for a label inside the helmet stating it meets CPSC’s federal safety standard.
When bicycling, scootering, or skateboarding, watch out for cars, and follow rules of the road and local regulations.

New CDC Report Finds More Adults Are Dying from Bicycle-Related Accidents; CPSC Says it Highlights the Importance of Helmets

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is reminding consumers of the importance of wearing helmets for sports and recreation to reduce the risk of head injury, including traumatic brain injuries (TBIs).  Helmets absorb much of the impact energy from a fall or collision, and can protect the skull and brain from more severe injury.
Bike helmets are required to meet CPSC’s federal safety standard.  They must have a label stating that they meet the standard.  Consumers can usually find this label on the liner inside of the helmet, on the exterior surface, or attached to the chin strap.  Information on bike helmets, and helmets for other activities, can be found at CPSC’s “Which Helmet for Which Activity” webpage.
Findings in a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show just how critical helmets are to preventing injuries and deaths.  The report found that from 2009 through 2018:
Bicycle-related deaths increased between 2009 and 2018, primarily among adults.
There were nearly 597,000 bicycle-related traumatic brain injuries treated in hospital emergency departments (ED) in the United States.
The rate of ED visits declined by almost 50% among kids, but declined only 6% among adults.
Males were three times more likely than females to end up in the ED with traumatic brain injuries.
Policies requiring bike helmets have been associated with long-term, sustained bike helmet use and a 20%-55% reduction in head injuries.
CPSC’s recent report on the impact of COVID-19 on hospital emergency room-treated injuries during the period March through September 2020 also highlighted the concern, finding that although bicycles had a slight increase (1%) in overall injuries, the increase jumped to 21% for users age 40 and above, and 39% for adults older than 70.  Injuries from skateboards, scooters, and hoverboards rose 39%.
Although no helmet design has been proven to prevent concussions, CDC’s HEADS UP helps identify concussion symptoms, and when to seek treatment.
To prevent sports-related head injuries, consumers should:
Always wear a helmet and other safety gear when bicycling and playing sports.
Follow manufacturer’s instructions.
Ensure the helmet fits and is worn correctly.
Replace helmets when needed.  Incidents can impact helmets, and you may not see the damage.  Cracks in the shell, worn straps, and missing pads or other parts are all reasons to replace a helmet.
Look for a label inside the helmet stating it meets CPSC’s federal safety standard.
When bicycling, scootering, or skateboarding, watch out for cars, and follow rules of the road and local regulations.

NIFA Invests Over $2.3M for Small Business Innovation Research

Source: US National Institute of Food and Agriculture News

NIFA Invests Over $2.3M for Small Business Innovation Research

Source: US National Institute of Food and Agriculture News

CBO’s Estimate of the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Effects of H.R. 1711, the Financial Inclusion in Banking Act of 2021, as Amended

Source: US Congressional Budget Office

The Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 establishes budget-reporting and enforcement procedures for legislation affecting direct spending or revenues. The net changes in outlays and revenues that are subject to those procedures are shown here.

H.R. 1711 would expand the duties of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Office of Community Affairs. CBO estimates that additional staff and administrative costs to comply with the bill’s requirements would increase direct spending by $10 million over the 2021-2031 period.

The bill also would reduce the Federal Reserve’s surplus fund by $10 million on September 30, 2031. As a result, CBO estimates that enacting the legislation would increase remittances to the Treasury (which are recorded in the budget as revenues) by $10 million in 2031.

H.R. 1228, Libya Stabilization Act

Source: US Congressional Budget Office

H.R. 1228 would authorize the appropriation of $30 million in 2022 to promote stability, free elections, civil society, and democratic governance in Libya; the same amount was appropriated for those purposes in 2021. Assuming appropriation of the specified amount, CBO estimates that providing such assistance would cost $26 million over the 2021-2026 period. The remainder would be spent after 2026.

The bill would require the Administration to provide several reports to the Congress on sanctions, the conflict in Libya, and related matters. On the basis of information about similar requirements, CBO estimates that providing the required reports would cost $1 million. H.R. 1228 also would authorize the Department of State to expand educational and cultural programs with Libya. On the basis of information about the costs of existing exchange programs and assistance to Libya, CBO estimates that implementing that provision would cost less than $500,000 each year and a total of $1 million over the 2021- 2026 period.

H.R. 2726, VA FOIA Reform Act of 2021

Source: US Congressional Budget Office

H.R. 2726 would require the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to develop a plan to respond to Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests within timelines required by current law. VA would be required to meet those timeliness standards within five years of the bill’s enactment. In that plan, which would be due within 180 days of the bill’s enactment, VA must describe the technology and process changes needed to improve response times. VA also would be required to report annually on its progress in implementing the plan and complying with FOIA response timelines.

Under current law, people may request information from the government under FOIA, and agencies must respond to those requests within 20 business days. FOIA requests are considered backlogged if the responsible agency does not provide a response within 20 business days of receipt. VA’s annual FOIA reports indicate the agency’s backlog averaged 3,360 requests over the 2017-2020 period—about 15 percent of the total number of annual requests received.

Will Pappas run scared, or run for reelection?

Source: US National Republican Congressional Committee

The following text contains opinion that is not, or not necessarily, that of MIL-OSI –

Chris Pappas is refusing to rule out the possibility of abandoning his district for a statewide run in 2022.

Facing redistricting and the challenge of defending Democrats’ socialist policies that have created a country in crisis, Pappas is eyeing the exits.

Guess that’s your best option when you’re Pelosi’s personal congressman and vote against the interests of your constituents!

NRCC Comment: Chris Pappas is the latest House Democrat to discover it might be easier to jump ship than run for reelection defending Democrats’ reckless policies.” – NRCC Spokeswoman Samantha Bullock