Why We Celebrate Juneteenth

Source: US GOIAM Union

Dear Sisters and Brothers,

Juneteenth is about freedom. It represents the end of slavery and the beginning of our journey towards an America that represents and includes everyone. 

Every day, the Machinists Union is proud to fight for justice on and off the job. While we remember our history advancing the causes of civil, human and workers’ rights, we know we have much further to go. The painful reminders of modern day discrimination and hate are all too common. 

On Juneteenth, now taking its rightful place as a federal holiday, let’s recommit ourselves to making equal opportunity a reality. Let’s grow our union and fight for every working family. The Fighting Machinists will always be on the right side of history. 

In solidarity,

Richard Johnsen

Chief of Staff to the International President 

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SPC Severe Thunderstorm Watch 287

Source: US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Note:  The expiration time in the watch graphic is amended if the watch is replaced, cancelled or extended.Note: Click for Watch Status Reports.
SEL7

URGENT – IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED
Severe Thunderstorm Watch Number 287
NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
240 PM CDT Sat Jun 19 2021

The NWS Storm Prediction Center has issued a

* Severe Thunderstorm Watch for portions of
West Central Illinois
Eastern Missouri

* Effective this Saturday afternoon and evening from 240 PM until
1000 PM CDT.

* Primary threats include…
Scattered large hail likely with isolated very large hail events
to 2 inches in diameter possible
Scattered damaging wind gusts to 70 mph likely
A tornado or two possible

SUMMARY…Clusters of intense thunderstorms are expected to develop
this afternoon and sag southward across the watch area. Very moist
and unstable conditions, along with favorable winds aloft, will
promote the risk of a few severe storms capable of damaging winds
and large hail.

The severe thunderstorm watch area is approximately along and 45
statute miles north and south of a line from 45 miles north of
Columbia MO to 40 miles east of Scott Afb IL. For a complete
depiction of the watch see the associated watch outline update
(WOUS64 KWNS WOU7).

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

REMEMBER…A Severe Thunderstorm Watch means conditions are
favorable for severe thunderstorms in and close to the watch area.
Persons in these areas should be on the lookout for threatening
weather conditions and listen for later statements and possible
warnings. Severe thunderstorms can and occasionally do produce
tornadoes.

&&

OTHER WATCH INFORMATION…CONTINUE…WW 285…

AVIATION…A few severe thunderstorms with hail surface and aloft to
2 inches. Extreme turbulence and surface wind gusts to 60 knots. A
few cumulonimbi with maximum tops to 500. Mean storm motion vector
30025.

…Hart

SEL7

URGENT – IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED
Severe Thunderstorm Watch Number 287
NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
240 PM CDT Sat Jun 19 2021

The NWS Storm Prediction Center has issued a

* Severe Thunderstorm Watch for portions of
West Central Illinois
Eastern Missouri

* Effective this Saturday afternoon and evening from 240 PM until
1000 PM CDT.

* Primary threats include…
Scattered large hail likely with isolated very large hail events
to 2 inches in diameter possible
Scattered damaging wind gusts to 70 mph likely
A tornado or two possible

SUMMARY…Clusters of intense thunderstorms are expected to develop
this afternoon and sag southward across the watch area. Very moist
and unstable conditions, along with favorable winds aloft, will
promote the risk of a few severe storms capable of damaging winds
and large hail.

The severe thunderstorm watch area is approximately along and 45
statute miles north and south of a line from 45 miles north of
Columbia MO to 40 miles east of Scott Afb IL. For a complete
depiction of the watch see the associated watch outline update
(WOUS64 KWNS WOU7).

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

REMEMBER…A Severe Thunderstorm Watch means conditions are
favorable for severe thunderstorms in and close to the watch area.
Persons in these areas should be on the lookout for threatening
weather conditions and listen for later statements and possible
warnings. Severe thunderstorms can and occasionally do produce
tornadoes.

&&

OTHER WATCH INFORMATION…CONTINUE…WW 285…

AVIATION…A few severe thunderstorms with hail surface and aloft to
2 inches. Extreme turbulence and surface wind gusts to 60 knots. A
few cumulonimbi with maximum tops to 500. Mean storm motion vector
30025.

…Hart

Note: The Aviation Watch (SAW) product is an approximation to the watch area. The actual watch is depicted by the shaded areas.
SAW7
WW 287 SEVERE TSTM IL MO 191940Z – 200300Z
AXIS..45 STATUTE MILES NORTH AND SOUTH OF LINE..
45N COU/COLUMBIA MO/ – 40E BLV/SCOTT AFB IL/
..AVIATION COORDS.. 40NM N/S /39N COU – 67ESE STL/
HAIL SURFACE AND ALOFT..2 INCHES. WIND GUSTS..60 KNOTS.
MAX TOPS TO 500. MEAN STORM MOTION VECTOR 30025.

LAT…LON 40129222 39188911 37898911 38829222

THIS IS AN APPROXIMATION TO THE WATCH AREA. FOR A
COMPLETE DEPICTION OF THE WATCH SEE WOUS64 KWNS
FOR WOU7.

Watch 287 Status Report Message has not been issued yet.

Note:  Click for Complete Product Text.TornadoesProbability of 2 or more tornadoes

Low (20%)

Probability of 1 or more strong (EF2-EF5) tornadoes

Low (5%)

WindProbability of 10 or more severe wind events

Mod (60%)

Probability of 1 or more wind events > 65 knots

Low (20%)

HailProbability of 10 or more severe hail events

Mod (60%)

Probability of 1 or more hailstones > 2 inches

Mod (30%)

Combined Severe Hail/WindProbability of 6 or more combined severe hail/wind events

High (>95%)

For each watch, probabilities for particular events inside the watch (listed above in each table) are determined by the issuing forecaster. The “Low” category contains probability values ranging from less than 2% to 20% (EF2-EF5 tornadoes), less than 5% to 20% (all other probabilities), “Moderate” from 30% to 60%, and “High” from 70% to greater than 95%. High values are bolded and lighter in color to provide awareness of an increased threat for a particular event.

SPC Severe Thunderstorm Watch 286

Source: US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Note:  The expiration time in the watch graphic is amended if the watch is replaced, cancelled or extended.Note: Click for Watch Status Reports.
SEL6

URGENT – IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED
Severe Thunderstorm Watch Number 286
NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
140 PM MDT Sat Jun 19 2021

The NWS Storm Prediction Center has issued a

* Severe Thunderstorm Watch for portions of
Eastern Colorado
Nebraska Panhandle

* Effective this Saturday afternoon and evening from 140 PM until
900 PM MDT.

* Primary threats include…
Scattered damaging winds and isolated significant gusts to 75
mph possible
Scattered large hail and isolated very large hail events to 2
inches in diameter possible

SUMMARY…Thunderstorms will develop near the Front Range and move
east into the High Plains this afternoon and evening. Large hail
and severe gusts will be the primary threats with the stronger
storms as a squall line eventually forms by early evening.

The severe thunderstorm watch area is approximately along and 70
statute miles east and west of a line from 15 miles northeast of
Scottsbluff NE to 10 miles south of La Junta CO. For a complete
depiction of the watch see the associated watch outline update
(WOUS64 KWNS WOU6).

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

REMEMBER…A Severe Thunderstorm Watch means conditions are
favorable for severe thunderstorms in and close to the watch area.
Persons in these areas should be on the lookout for threatening
weather conditions and listen for later statements and possible
warnings. Severe thunderstorms can and occasionally do produce
tornadoes.

&&

OTHER WATCH INFORMATION…CONTINUE…WW 285…

AVIATION…A few severe thunderstorms with hail surface and aloft to
2 inches. Extreme turbulence and surface wind gusts to 65 knots. A
few cumulonimbi with maximum tops to 500. Mean storm motion vector
26030.

…Smith

Note: The Aviation Watch (SAW) product is an approximation to the watch area. The actual watch is depicted by the shaded areas.
SAW6
WW 286 SEVERE TSTM CO NE 191940Z – 200300Z
AXIS..70 STATUTE MILES EAST AND WEST OF LINE..
15NE BFF/SCOTTSBLUFF NE/ – 10S LHX/LA JUNTA CO/
..AVIATION COORDS.. 60NM E/W /9NNE BFF – 38N TBE/
HAIL SURFACE AND ALOFT..2 INCHES. WIND GUSTS..65 KNOTS.
MAX TOPS TO 500. MEAN STORM MOTION VECTOR 26030.

LAT…LON 42030203 37890224 37890480 42030476

THIS IS AN APPROXIMATION TO THE WATCH AREA. FOR A
COMPLETE DEPICTION OF THE WATCH SEE WOUS64 KWNS
FOR WOU6.

Watch 286 Status Report Message has not been issued yet.

Note:  Click for Complete Product Text.TornadoesProbability of 2 or more tornadoes

Low (10%)

Probability of 1 or more strong (EF2-EF5) tornadoes

Low ( 65 knots

Mod (40%)

HailProbability of 10 or more severe hail events

Mod (40%)

Probability of 1 or more hailstones > 2 inches

Mod (30%)

Combined Severe Hail/WindProbability of 6 or more combined severe hail/wind events

High (80%)

For each watch, probabilities for particular events inside the watch (listed above in each table) are determined by the issuing forecaster. The “Low” category contains probability values ranging from less than 2% to 20% (EF2-EF5 tornadoes), less than 5% to 20% (all other probabilities), “Moderate” from 30% to 60%, and “High” from 70% to greater than 95%. High values are bolded and lighter in color to provide awareness of an increased threat for a particular event.

World Refugee Day

Source: USAID

Today, on World Refugee Day, the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) reaffirms the individual dignity of tens of millions of people forced to flee their countries to escape conflict, persecution, or the impact of natural disasters. These are individuals who feel they have no choice but to leave their homes behind and embark on an unforeseen journey, not knowing when—or if—they will ever be able to return home.

The United Nations estimates that more than 80 million people were driven from their homes by the end of 2020, and nearly 21 million of them are refugees who have fled across an international border. Due to longer-lasting conflicts, greater political and economic instability, and increasing climate-change shocks, these numbers are increasing every year, placing us in the midst of the greatest refugee crisis since the Second World War. Despite the ongoing conflict and insecurity we are witnessing in places like Syria, and South Sudan, it is encouraging to see host countries, often supported by USAID, come together and provide refugees with relief, opportunity, and a sense of purpose.

As a nation of immigrants and refugees, our support for refugees reinforces who we are as Americans. As the single largest provider of humanitarian assistance worldwide, the U.S. will continue to provide life-saving aid to refugees that helps them rebuild their lives; empowers them with the tools to be self-reliant; and places them on the path to a peaceful, prosperous, and hopeful future.

Nobody chooses to become a refugee. These are people who have fled because their lives and the lives of those they love most depend on it. On this World Refugee Day and every day, we stand together with the millions of refugees around the world, and the host countries and communities that support them.

Administrator Samantha Power’s American University of Armenia Commencement Address

Source: USAID

Remarks

Good afternoon, and congratulations to American University of Armenia’s class of 2021.

I am honored and grateful for the opportunity to address you on an occasion that I hope stays with you for the rest of your lives. I also want to thank the family, loved ones, friends, faculty, and staff who prepared you all for this moment. And a special thanks to Dr. Markides and the leadership at American University of Armenia for the invitation to speak today and for your commitment to our longstanding partnership.

Commencement speeches are inherently motivational and uplifting affairs, but I cannot honor what you have gained by being here today without acknowledging what you’ve lost. Not only are you graduating into a world that has been tilted off its axis by a global pandemic, but the lives of six of your fellow students, as well as beloved family members and friends, were cut short as violence erupted in a decades-long conflict. My heart is with each of you and your families as you grieve, and as you understandably wonder what it will take for the Armenian people to see lasting peace.

After this past year, there is no doubt that you are ready to confront whatever comes your way. You should not have to demonstrate this much resilience so early in your lives, but you have, inspiringly so. You’ve stuck together to overcome these demanding circumstances, and I hope that gives you a sense of pride—the same pride that your teachers, administrators, parents, and friends must feel in you.

I actually had the opportunity to visit the American University of Armenia just three years ago, and if I’m being honest, there were parts of me that were anguished about that visit.

We had made, during my time in the Obama Administration, what I had thought to be several important steps forward in terms of advancing the dignity of people all over the world. We made serious global commitments to fight climate change, de-escalate tensions with long-standing antagonists like Iran and Cuba, and we worked to support democracy abroad, including in countries like Armenia.

Still, when I came I was arriving in Armenia fully aware that we had not lived up to our commitment to recognize the Armenian genocide during President Obama’s time in office. And during my visit, I carried with me a deep sense of regret and disappointment.

Then I visited AUA, just two months after the Velvet Revolution. And I was inspired by students, professors, and advocates who had just been in the streets, successfully advocating for democratic values. And I remembered that the only antidote to a defeat is not despair, but resolve. That not yet, does not have to mean never.

And today, I get to address you, not just on behalf of an American Administration that has finally recognized what the world has long known to be a genocide in Armenia—but as Administrator of the Agency—USAID—that helped found and support this University. And I hear the stories of this incredible generation of young Armenians and I’m inspired anew.

The young woman who studied to be an investigative journalist, and who is already raising awareness about drought and water depletion in her community in the heart of the Ararat Valley. The student who also happens to be the only social worker from her village, in contact with as many as 150 families a day. The graduate studying public relations, who is also working to improve basic public services and create bus shelters so that commuters in Yerevan don’t have to wait in the blazing sun or freezing rain just to get to work.

That is what you all are doing today—that is the kind of resolve you’re showing while still in school. Even now, I am heartened by the empathy and urgency within you, Armenia’s future leaders. But I am even more encouraged about the future your generation will create—a generation keenly focused on the needs of others, proudly advocating for marginalized groups, unafraid to demand a better, greener, more equal world.

Because here is the reality: Setbacks happen. Losses accumulate. Malign forces in the world will not give up without a fight. You will live to see people perpetrate evil acts—genocide in Western China, famine in Northern Ethiopia, ethnic cleansing in Myanmar—you will witness those same people deny that they are happening.

That sad two-step of history has not yet been overcome. And unfortunately the repression that these regimes show—first of people, then the truth—that repression often works. But just because it works, does not mean it will win. It requires the resolve—of young activists and advocates like all of you—fighting for the dignity of every soul to beat repression back, push for peace, uncover the truth, and ensure that lies have short legs.

My sincere congratulations to all of you on this very important day. I wish you all the best. Congrats again.

Administrator Samantha Power with Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs Marc Garneau at the German Marshall Fund’s Brussels Forum

Source: USAID

Remarks

MS. GLASSER: I’m Susan Glasser from the New Yorker and we have the opportunity to open the final session of this year’s Brussels Forum. We have the nice minimal topic of democracy’s next decade. So we can talk about pretty much anything we want.

It turns out that we’re going to have a panel that’s more Atlantic than transatlantic today because Minister Sophie Wilmès from Belgium has been called into a last minute Cabinet meeting, but it’s my great honor and pleasure to introduce, I think, a superstar panel. And we have with us Ambassador Samantha Power, who is the newly confirmed head of USAID, and a veteran of both the Obama and now the Biden Administrations.

I’m delighted to be speaking with her today, and we are joined by The Honorable Marc Garneau, who is the Minister for Foreign Affairs from Canada, served as Minister of Transport before that. I think he’s been a member of the Canadian Parliament since 2008. And he also, for those of you paying attention, is former head of the Canadian Space Agency, and an astronaut, so we have lots to talk about with both of them today and not too much time.

What a capstone event, really, for this year’s Brussels Forum and particularly, obviously, resonant timing with the conclusion of President Biden’s very first trip overseas, and given that our subject today is democracy, I want to just jump right in and ask about that to start off with.

Ambassador Power, you served, obviously, in both the Obama and now the Biden Administrations. This framing that we’ve heard again and again from President Biden about essentially becoming a global conflict, hopefully not a hot conflict, between democracies and rising autocracies such as China and Russia. That’s very different than the sort of big picture framing of foreign policy in the Obama era and obviously events have occurred, and inside our own democracies, as well as what’s happened with China and Russia in the years since you were in office before. I’m just curious, how do you see the difference between foreign policy now and foreign policy in the Obama Administration, and why are we talking so much about democracy now?

ADMINISTRATOR POWER: Thank you so much, Susan, thanks for doing this.

There will be many cases, I’m sure, in the next 45 minutes where I will want to ask you the same question, because I know you have views on all of this. And Mr. Minister, it’s great to meet you this way. I look forward to meeting in person, when circumstances allow.

I think it’s interesting to pose the question the way you did in terms of these snapshots, and I guess I’d offer a few thoughts. Fifteen straight years of freedom in decline is different than where we were, especially at the beginning of the Obama years back in 2009. That’s hard to believe that’s 12 years ago. We can look at our kids, Susan, to know that it’s 12 years ago. I just think you could tell yourself a particular story about the financial crisis and the fallout from that back in 2009. But once these trends become embedded and perpetuated to the extent that they have and once — especially, I think seeing the backsliding in established democracies. I think that was not something that — it’s very fair to say not something that was anticipated in 2009. And, again, historians more informed than me, will go back and disaggregate the range of factors that have helped fuel the phenomenon, really of democratic backsliding. But I think that’s a factor behind the frame that you mentioned.

A second factor is the assertiveness of China, not only in its [inaudible], but globally. I’m just back late yesterday from Central America. And you see, for example, when it will come at some point to talking about vaccine diplomacy and all the rest, but you see China having delivered vaccines in El Salvador, you see the flipping of recognition in the region and the pressure from China for people to shift their recognition from Taiwan to China. But all across Sub-Saharan Africa, all across Latin America, and that’s not without impact on the trends insofar as part of what the investments secure and, or at least what China asked for is votes within the United Nations. Votes that in turn erode democratic and human rights norms that even if they weren’t always honored, nonetheless undergirded what was called the international system over the last 70 plus years. So that actually, the fact that you have a lot of bilateral leverage and that you’re throwing your weight around in that way then has ramifications on what the norms even look like over time, so that’s something of course that’s gotten President Biden’s attention.

But, last thing I’d say, I guess for now, is just that we’re also seeing some very intriguing trends, where it — citizens in a vast array of countries aren’t reading the Freedom House reports, right? They haven’t gotten the memo that democracy is in decline. And we saw, I think more protests in 2019 before the pandemic than in any year of recorded history, and a lot of those protests, fueled by concerns about corruption, fueled — associated with elites perhaps of all kinds, but we see, I think in the Biden Administration, a real opening and a real Achilles heel for many of the most centralized, either autocratic or trending illiberal countries because the centralization of political power very rarely occurs without the centralization of economic resources as well.

And so I think that’s why you saw two weeks ago, before President Biden’s international trip, him issuing the first ever Presidential Memorandum, National Security Memorandum, on anti-corruption as a core national security threat and core national security agenda item. And I think we see there a key pillar to our democracy work. That I think was not — I was President Obama’s advisor for human rights in his first term and we launched the Open Government Partnership and put in place, I think, some tools that we can use today on corruption. But I don’t think it will seem quite as the pillar that we see it as today to our democracy work around the world.

MS. GLASSER: So, Minister Garneau, I want to bring you in here because I think one interesting question is, you see President Biden on this first trip and you were there at the G7 meeting, Minister Garneau, and so you can tell us a little bit what that felt like and the difference that you’re seeing. But President Biden sort of had this message of America is back and we’re going to rally the democracies, but it’s a lot easier to say that than to do that in terms of consensus when it comes to, in particular, even coming to a common agreement on what nature of challenge China is, for example. To what extent do you see kind of shades of difference or different approaches right now among the Western leaders when it comes to sort of naming and understanding the autocratic challenges to democracy?

MINISTER GARNEAU: Thank you very much for the question. And the first part of it dealing with President Biden engaging multilaterally, the G7 you mentioned, but there are numerous other multilateral bodies that he is engaging in and this is, I think, sending a very good signal. It is this reengagement on the part of the United States and let’s be honest, the most influential and biggest economy in the world. I think that sends a signal that was missing for about four years, and so I think that’s moving us in the right direction at a time when democracy is under threat as Samantha pointed it out very clearly.

Whether you’re talking about on the human rights front, we’re seeing more and more threats with respect to people’s individual rights in many of the countries that are autocratic. The rule of law is something that we take great pride in, in our interactions with other countries in the world, that we make the assumption we must operate within the rule of law in dealing with each other and the rules-based international order; those are all things under threat.

The judicial system in certain countries is not independent from those who are running the country and that’s very, very preoccupying. Media freedom is under threat in many, many countries and this is something that’s also extremely preoccupying. So when the United States re-engages with other countries and we begin to take a multilateral approach, such as at the G7, I think it sends a stronger signal that those of us who believe in human rights and democracy and all those values are speaking up to make a very important point with countries that perhaps do not view things the same way, who engage in coercive diplomacy, who practice arbitrary detention of citizens from another country because they are not happy with that country, those kinds of behaviors, so we’ve got to speak up loud and clear about it, if we’re going to reverse the course that I think the planet is on at the moment.

MS. GLASSER: So you mentioned arbitrary detention; I know that’s something you’ve been very active on given Canada’s recent experience with China. Tell us a little bit about that and other new kinds of threats and challenges that one faces in a world where China has become more assertive outside of its own sphere. And I want to ask you that as well, Ambassador Power.

Like, I’m thinking about this Belarus, essentially state-sponsored hijacking, literally bringing down a European civilian airliner to drag an opposition journalist off the plane, with at least a tacit assent, if not active cooperation of Russia. That’s a new kind of threat if that becomes commonplace, if we’re not seen as responding in an assertive enough way, so if both of you could maybe give us a little bit of a perspective on what it actually means, right?

Democracy versus autocracy is a very abstract framing, but these are actually quite concrete challenges that we’re talking about here, whether it is arbitrary detention or something like attacking outright the international order on civil aviation.

MINISTER GARNEAU: Well if you like, I’ll start off. I mean, my predecessor deserves the credit for coming up with this, but we felt that it was important for Canada to speak up on the issue of arbitrary detention. In this case because we have some citizens who have been arbitrarily detained in China, without any justification, because China has a bone to pick with our country. That kind of practice is totally unacceptable and we decided to try to engage other countries. We’re now up to 63 countries who have signed, if you like, the Declaration Against Arbitrary Detention in State-to-State Relations, and by the way, China is not the only country. Our declaration is actually country-neutral; it’s country agnostic because there are other countries that practice this, and that’s totally unacceptable and so it’s important for us to speak up in the same way as we all have to speak up when a country like Belarus pulls down an aircraft from the skies because they deliberately want to get a hold of a journalist on board. That is totally unacceptable, and it is really, really important that we all speak out very strongly against it. And the more we do it multilaterally to show that we all feel the same way about it, I think the greater effect it has.

MS. GLASSER: Samantha, do you want to also weigh in on this one?

ADMINISTRATOR POWER: I would just put it also in a larger context of extraterritorial acts of impunity, acts of impunity in two respects. Brazen violations of international norms, international law, and a show of how invulnerable certain actors have felt. And I think you could put in that category the poisonings and the assassination attempts beyond borders; you could put in that category what — the Chinese apprehension of citizens who might be traveling in Thailand; you could put in that category the North Korean assassination in a major airport.

So, the number of these actions, where countries, authoritarian countries feel impunity to do things beyond their borders — it’s been adding up. And I think what’s really important about what the Minister said and what President Biden stressed on this recent trip is: we need to increase the costs for those actions. And that was really hard when the United States treated multilateral institutions as if they were there to rip off the United States rather than strengthen and enforce norms that we all, as in democratic countries as well, benefit from. And you see this also with China’s attempts to censor individuals who aren’t living anywhere near China, but who deign to weigh in on events inside China. In Xinjiang or in Hong Kong, as we saw starting a few years ago with the Marriott and the NBA, and all the rest. And so this sense that these authoritarian countries have that they get to enforce their writ wherever they feel like it, is something every democratic citizen and every democratic actor in the world has an interest in banding together to condemn and to respond with, as robust an enforcement mechanism as we can mobilize.

And so I think what we have right now is, sort of an agreement on the diagnosis among democracies and ever more willingness on the part of our partners to join us in condemnations. I think the last American Administration by the end of its tenure, if you remember, Susan, was speaking out on Xinjiang, was putting sanctions in place, but never attempting to coordinate those measures ahead of time with our closest allies. And so if we are going to increase the cost, it’s going to have to be done with the democracies of the world standing together and that will be our best prospect, I think, of denting this culture of impunity that has gone on too long.

MS. GLASSER: Well, can I ask you about what you think about the tools in the toolkit? Just as these are new or at least more aggressive forms that have challenged the international order, it strikes me that we don’t yet have — I mean condemnation is one thing; rounds and rounds of sanctions as we’ve seen on Russia for example over the years since 2014 and its annexation of Crimea, but at the same time, that obviously hasn’t been the deterrent effect than anyone would want.

Even with President Biden, rose a lot of expectations when it came to say the Khashoggi killing which the previous administration didn’t do much about even though this was an American rescued journalist who was literally dismembered by what appears to be Saudi agents on the territory of a NATO ally. You release the information about the Khashoggi killing, but MBS has not faced the kind of sanctions that I think — expectations had risen.

I raised that case not so that we can talk about that, but what beyond sanctions — there’s also the even more explicit military type threats from drone warfare, let’s say, which is much easier to conduct outside of borders or around traditional borders and then there’s cyber-attacks, and this is a subject at the meeting with Putin this week. But I don’t think it’s clear to people what it means to be more aggressively confronting these kinds of threats. Do you have any insight for us?

ADMINISTRATOR POWER: Well, let me just say from my vantage point at USAID, a few of the ways that we’re thinking about contesting erosions in democracy, the liberal trends and the kind of impunity that we’ve just been speaking about. As I alluded to earlier, thinking through the corruption piece of it, and what insights the United States and our allies might have into leaders that for all of their bravado and all of their shows of perceived impunity, clearly feel very fragile and in their own way, at risk at home. And so thinking through how different actors can be empowered to expose some of the ill-gotten gains or the natural resource extraction that for example, China is carrying out in large parts of the developing world. I think there’s information there and there are actors, very brave actors, of course not at this point in China able to operate freely, but look at the reaction to the exposé on the Uighur detention network, and the amount of panic that that generated. So this question of, sort of, what is known at USAID, how we can empower our partners who are working, let’s say not in those full authoritarian countries, but in countries that might be at a tipping point in one direction or the other. I think that’s really important.

I think for us together as democracies, also in a more positive sense, to be teaming up when there’s a moment of opportunity, of the kind for example, that exists right now in Sudan. I was very pleased when President Macron, about a month ago, was maybe two weeks into my time at USAID, convened a conference looking at debt relief for the country of Sudan and what other resources we can bring to bear. The U.S. Congress has passed a $700 million spending package. I mean if you had told me when we left office back in January 2017, left the Obama Administration, that I would be a part of an Administration figuring out how to spend $700 million in a country that was then run by somebody who was indicted at The Hague for genocide, but those opportunities — there aren’t that many. We’re all familiar with the Burmas and the Ethiopias and the disappointments when it comes to democratic dividends, or the lack thereof, and really disturbing violence and human pain. But when you have an opportunity like Sudan presents, I think all of us are thinking through, okay, how do we come in and try to support that?

The other dimension of it, and I could say a lot more about what USAID is doing in different countries in these ways. But I don’t want to lose sight of another key, perhaps distinguishing feature, of the way that democracies now talk about international leadership on democracy, and that is by talking about the importance of democracies delivering at home. And so in fact, if I think about what are the tools in the toolbox, maybe less on the issue that we were just talking about but on democracy generally and on winning the war of ideas and the battle of narratives. I think it’s every bit as important, or more important, that Joe Biden’s spending bills are likely to cut child poverty in half in the United States. I think it’s incredibly important that after a very rocky response to COVID for the first year, that the United States, taking advantage of its scientific innovation and funding from the state in partnership with pharmaceutical companies, but rush to vaccines online has been in a position to respond robustly domestically, that’s a show of competence and a reminder of the innovative capacity that the United States has. Whereas before it was all people were thinking about in the context of COVID, was our polarization, how we couldn’t agree on anything, and the disputes over whether to wear a mask or not wear a mask.

While those disputes still exist throughout the country and impede our last leg here somewhat, this is an overwhelming scientific and governance success story. And it’s something that comes about because the President came along who wanted the democracy to work on behalf, not of blue states or red states, but on behalf of the populations across the country. So I think really thinking through the connectivity and again all foreign diplomats and internationalists talk this way now, in a way that I don’t think we did five, six years ago, but just actually looking inward in our democracies to see how the progress, hopefully that we are making, also can be talked about and integrated into how we talk about the importance of democracy internationally.

MS. GLASSER: Well, I’m glad you brought up this issue of the connection between a sort of democracy at home and foreign policy and democracy internationally that obviously I think is a key question for anyone involved in, in the practice of foreign policy right now. But Minister Garneau, I’d love your perspective as someone closely watching what’s happening here in the United States; what is happening to American credibility? Can we just show back up and say like, “Okay guys we’re, you’re the head of the table again; we’re delighted to begin multilateralism?” The world looks at America’s internal crisis of democracy and how does that affect its ability to act internationally?

MINISTER GARNEAU: That’s a very good point and, and you’re right to bring it up because it’s one thing to try to project your values internationally, but people in other countries are naturally going to ask the question, well how’s it going back in your own country? For example, at the moment, because of some of the measures and criticisms we’ve had of China, they’re focusing very much on how we have treated our indigenous people in our country, and they’re trying to sort of exploit that as much as possible in terms of putting out information in Canada about that. So it is extremely important that — as countries, that we also address the issues domestically as well. And Canada has very clearly said that we are a country that has racism in it, whether it’s anti-Black racism, whether it is anti-Semitism, whether it’s Islamophobia, whether it is the way we have treated our indigenous peoples, and now a certain rise in anti-Asian racism.

And I think the first step is to face that very, very squarely. And in fact, when President Biden and Prime Minister Trudeau met in February, they developed a roadmap on the two countries working together and one element of that recognized that both countries have to deal with racism in their own countries. And that is one of the things that we’ve clearly recognized in. I know the United States — that Biden and his administration has done the same. And both countries are working towards eliminating that; that’s not going to happen overnight, but it is essential to your credibility if you’re going to go out and try to project your values on other countries.

MS. GLASSER: To be blunt, I mean people like President Putin, he’s on the record as saying, for the last few years, well, this internal crisis of democracy is a sign of the failure of the West, and, the bottom line is that this crisis is not limited to, say, the election of Donald Trump inside the United States. But it’s something that’s happening across the board in different ways in the liberal democracies of the past, and that that’s looking in the rearview mirror. Do you — how do you counter that?

MINISTER GARNEAU: Oh, certainly, we, as countries, are far from perfect, and we have to work on that, but it’s very easy for somebody like President Putin just to throw rocks at other countries, because he is feeling the criticism that’s being addressed towards his country, whether it’s, the annexation of Crimea, whether it’s the treatment of Alexei Navalny. Those are going to provoke, in somebody like Putin, a natural instinct to criticize other countries and, yes, fair enough. We have to make sure that we address our own issues. It doesn’t prevent us from also pointing out to other countries that they are — they are offside with respect to some fundamental values.

MS. GLASSER: Ambassador Power, I’m curious now that you’ve just taken your first foreign trip into this new role, how much do you find that the crisis of American democracy is a hindrance to America’s ability to work on democracy around the world? Are people bringing this up with you? What is — what do you tell them about the credibility of our country at this moment in order to make commitments internationally?

ADMINISTRATOR POWER: Well, I’m just back from Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala. And all three countries are so hungry for economic growth, economic investment, economic development, which is the core — at the core of USAID’s mission.

And to be honest, Susan, it’s — sometimes it’s really helpful [laughs] to get away from the editorial pages and the abstract question of, when will we retrieve our credibility or can we, or how big is the deficit, and are our friends going to be hedging, and have — you know? And just, I went to a village that was obliterated by Hurricane Eta and USAID was there, helping people repair their homes and not asking for anything in return, just sort of saying to the people, hey, let’s think about, infrastructure investments that make you less vulnerable the next time around because we know we’re going to have more climate events.

I saw the relief in Guatemala in the wake of Vice President Harris’s announcement that 500,000 vaccines will be coming to Guatemala. This is a country, really, really struggling with the pandemic right now. I mean, no relief from social distancing or from mask wearing or businesses not even close to coming back up to speed and hungry for American innovation, public health support to help them back on their feet. And so I think again, to remember what the United States is about — this has been very gratifying for me, having not worked at USAID before. We have missions in 80 countries in the world and to see American ingenuity at work, the compassion of American people, which by the way was sustained, also, in the last four years of the Trump Administration by internationalist Republicans that may not have challenged President Trump in the ways that some of us might have hoped, but sustained support for programs out in the world that are making a critical difference. And where do those countries look when they see democratic backsliding or, for example, slippage in the anti-corruption fight as all three countries are unfortunately showing, which is going to make economic investment much, much more challenging and make it much harder to deal with new causes of migration, as well, if those — if, people aren’t able to invest in investigations and anti-corruption and if the rule of law is going in the wrong and not the right direction.

But where do they turn to support? They turn to the United States and they turn to our democratic allies on the ground in these three countries, and there again, in the places — and this again, just the universe in a grain of sand, right. I can’t say I’m either an expert on the three countries or on how — the extent to which one can extrapolate. But what the minister was describing globally, I just want to stress is true in every country, where these issues are in peril around the world, which is when, on the ground, in, for example, Guatemala, we and our European, Canadian, Japanese, Korean, and other friends speak together as democracy — democracies on behalf of the rule of law. That is much more powerful in getting the attention of leaders that feel, in the wake of COVID, economically vulnerable and in need of public health support.

And so just what happened in Europe was so important these last days. And I think part of what we are trying to do now, all of us, is instantiate that in countries, so that we are synched up in a way that we really want again over the course of the last four years.

MS. GLASSER: I know we’re going to run out of time, but I want to ask each of you a couple more specific questions because I take your point, Ambassador Power. That this can be a very abstract conversation. For you, President Biden has said on the campaign trail that he was interested in holding a summit of democracies. I’m curious if that’s going to happen, when that’s going to be, and what you think we can get out of it.

ADMINISTRATOR POWER: Thank you. Well, it’s not to me to make news in answering those specific questions. Sorry.

MS. GLASSER: Come on, this is the big closing event of the Brussels Forum. What better time to make some moves?

ADMINISTRATOR POWER: I think others will be well-positioned to fill you in on those details, but I think the lines of effort are very important.

MS. GLASSER: But it is happening?

ADMINISTRATOR POWER: Yeah, absolutely. Lots of planning is afoot. I think, again, the details will be forthcoming from someone, I’m sure, one day soon. But I think that, again, the lines of effort are including such matters as we’ve talked about, the question of what work can we as democracies do to combat corruption? What would it mean if we were all rowing in the same direction? We haven’t actually yet today, weirdly, talked about misinformation and cybersecurity. I mean, Canada actually, maybe Minister, you can speak to this, but as — is, I think, ahead of many democracies in terms of how it has handled misinformation.

I don’t think anybody these days can talk about societal consensus because all of our countries are divided in certain ways. But I think Prime Minister Trudeau has done a very able job in finding ways to enlist political opposition, actually, in being on the same side of rebutting misinformation or foreign interference. And trolling that can occur, whether in an election season or just in order to sow division out of an election season, but there are lots of countries around the world where that very thing is happening, and they could use best practices, lessons learned, some technical assistance, depending on whether it’s civil society or a government that we’re talking about.

So I think — I think thinking through what — when we pull our resources, what does that look like in terms of cybersecurity, but also in terms of the fight against disinformation? And independent media struggling everywhere in the world with new media infringements and laws, getting sued. This disparity between the resources of oligarchs who don’t want their finances exposed, and the plucky and very, very courageous journalists who are still doing that work, that disparity in terms of economic resourcing can put a lot of independent journalists and anti-corruption investigators out of business, not only in jail, which — or are unable to do their work. So thinking through how we democracies come together to try to ensure that, whether it’s from governments or from foundations, that there’s some insurance for actors that are doing this vital work, which really is a source of vulnerability for [inaudible] regimes.

MS. GLASSER: So Ambassador — sorry, Mr. Minister, Samantha has listed, I think, a pretty long and comprehensive list of the kinds of challenges where democracies might work together around the world. What are the threats, I think, would be interesting to hear from you, that most concern you when it comes to this democratic backsliding? I mean, what are some concrete things that you’re most concerned about right now?

MINISTER GARNEAU: Well, I think that Samantha touched on something extremely important; that is disinformation or misinformation that is deliberately propagated out there. And one of the things that we did at the G7 when it was held in Canada in 2018 was to propose something called the Rapid Response Mechanism. And this is really an effort of resources to combat disinformation, and at the beginning, it was fairly simple to recognize when a piece of information was deliberate disinformation. But today, it is not only pervasive, but it’s also much more sophisticated and it influences people, obviously, in many cases in the wrong direction, in the direction in which the propagators intended. And I think it has an incredibly important effect on democracy itself because people are believing in things that are simply not true.

Secondly, media freedom. The Media Freedom Coalition is an effort that tries to recognize how important it is for the media to continue to be an independent group of people who are able to put out the truth at a time when we need it more than ever, because I mean, we can all list tons of examples of where awful things have happened because people were influenced by incorrect information, and there was not sufficient presence of the media to correct that misinformation. So those are looming threats that are with us at the moment and that will continue to grow unless we address them, well, full frontally.

MS. GLASSER: So Ambassador Power, I’m going to give you the last word. We’re almost out of time but you raised this important question at the very beginning of your remarks about the fact that we’re now 15 years into democratic backsliding. Every year, we look at the Freedom House report and we see that the number of democracies around the world is shrinking in some important way, and I just — I’d love for you to leave us with a little bit of a sense of like, the framing here was democracy’s next decade. Is this — is this a long term trend that we’re seeing? Do you expect that this democratic backsliding is going to continue? Do you believe that what’s happened inside the United States in the last few years when it comes to assaults on our democracy like challenges to voting rights? For example, how much do you see that that’s part of this global trend or do you see it actually as an outlier? I’d just love for you to leave us with that thought today.

ADMINISTRATOR POWER: Well, I’d say a couple things. I mean first, as I indicated at the beginning, I do think that the way that citizen action is getting mobilized in so many parts of the world, even notwithstanding COVID, right. Take the climate protest movement all around the world, which is — played a hugely important, if undefinable, role in expanding the political space, I think, for leaders or, in some cases, nudging leaders to go further than they might otherwise have done. And so, I think it’s important to think about democracy at work, and the return on democracy at work, and I think that — I’m not saying that, again, what we collectively are managing to do in terms of cutting carbon emissions is sufficient, by any stretch of the imagination. But think of where we would be without that bottom-up movement that has taken hold, building on the foundations laid by the environmental movement decades ago.

I come back to the fact that in 2019, there were more pro-democracy demonstrations than during the Arab Spring, then at the end of the Cold War, that there is citizen — I think we might call it entitlement to better returns on citizenship and to better governance and we saw that here. We — President Biden’s agenda would look very different if not for the activism of young people in Georgia, particularly African American women who mobilized a state where I went to high school in. If you’d told me that we’d have two Democratic senators from Georgia and that they would be the difference between President Biden being able to cut child poverty in half, and hopefully, now be an arsenal of vaccines for the world or not, I would have been very skeptical. I mean, just the change that has been wrought by the, yes, changing voter demographic but also just the work to get past some of the voter restrictions that existed before and now. Even more work will be required to push for citizen voices to be heard.

So, I date myself. I’m probably dating you, too, Susan, but we — I think we graduated from university when it was the end of history and people were predicting with the fall of the wall and the end of the Cold War. The triumph of liberal democracy and of course, many — much self-analysis has been done about expectations for what China would become as it grew richer and more connected in the global economy, those expectations and hopes, at this point at least, dashed. But, I think — I think we do know the seams in our own democracies, and we expose them to the world because we [inaudible] address far better than we know the vulnerabilities in the authoritarian countries and whether the early days of COVID which people were focused on. On the question of how COVID started, but it’s also to remember just how maladaptive it was for there to be a climate of fear in which people couldn’t come forward and raise a flare about what was happening in their communities. The same is true in economic circumstances when bad numbers are — we know it back from prior authoritarian eras, when bad economic numbers or are shunned and only, yes men are welcome in the inner circle. And others these days are prosecuted for sometimes trumped up corruption charges or other trumped up charges over time. That doesn’t strike me as adaptive, right? No more than it would in an American business or any business to be surrounded by people afraid to deliver truth to leaders.

So, I guess where I would end up in the spirit of ending also on a note of hope, is just that there is a universal longing to be treated with respect and to experience individual dignity or community dignity. To not be a means, but to be an end in oneself. And that’s true across geography and culture. And I think you can see it on the Chinese netizens when they’re allowed to speak freely; some of the expression of those aspirations and those longings and you see it in Sudan that brought down a genocidal dictator against all odds with female led protests. And you see it in so many parts of the world. So, in the end, I think the force of those aspirations is what is going to be hard for any government to reckon with. But we don’t live in that future, the ill-defined future — we live in the present. I think what’s important now, given how much weight China is throwing around the world on behalf of a very different model, including by providing surveillance technologies and the tools of repression to other countries. It’s important that we have our answer as a community of democracies in return. And I think that’s what President Biden, Prime Minister Trudeau, and other Democratic leaders are building toward building back better.

MS. GLASSER: Well, Ambassador Power, thank you so much. We can — I would say that, I guess this is why I stayed a journalist and, it is an act of optimism to be in government, and I’m here to remind us that history smacked us in the face a little bit in the few decades since the end of the Cold War. But what a great conversation. I have to thank Mr. Garneau, really invaluable perspective today and to Ambassador Power as well. And I hope it was a great Atlantic conclusion to this Brussels Forum. I know that the head of GMF and soon your future colleague in the Biden Administration, Karen Godfrey, is going to follow us now with some closing remarks for the event that I want to thank both of you for our terrific conversation today. Thank you.

ADMINISTRATOR POWER: Thank you, Susan.

MINISTER GARNEAU: A real pleasure. Thank you.

EPA Announces $569 Million WIFIA Loan for Flood, Climate Resilience in the Fargo-Moorhead Metropolitan Area

Source: US Environment Protection Agency

News Releases from HeadquartersWater (OW)

Nationally, 52 WIFIA loans are financing $23 billion in water upgrades, creating 54,000 jobs

06/18/2021

Contact Information: 

WASHINGTON – Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced a $569 million Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (WIFIA) loan for a project to increase climate resilience for communities in the Fargo-Moorhead metropolitan area by reducing flood risks. This project will provide critical health and the environmental protections and create thousands of jobs while EPA’s WIFIA loan will save the community hundreds of millions of dollars.

“This project illustrates that strong partnerships can be forged through investments in water infrastructure,” said EPA Administrator Michael S. Regan. “Through water infrastructure, we can address local challenges while creating good paying jobs. Programs like WIFIA and the State Revolving Funds have a track record of success and could be scaled up to benefit more communities under President Biden’s American Jobs Plan.”

“Today’s action will accelerate the diversion project’s timeline, save hundreds of millions of dollars for taxpayers and protect North Dakota’s largest metro area from catastrophic flooding, while also providing a national model for how a major flood protection project can be accomplished with local, state, federal and private sector collaboration,” said North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum. “We’re deeply grateful to the EPA, our congressional delegation and all the partners whose hard work helped us reach this milestone.”

“Proper flood protection is key to growing the economy and protecting the livelihood of North Dakotans in the Red River Valley,” said U.S. Senator Kevin Cramer. “The Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act loan announced today will go toward bolstering the water infrastructure in Fargo-Moorhead so they can be better prepared during flood seasons. I am grateful to Administrator Regan and the EPA officials who have been working on this effort for years, and I look forward to working with state and local leaders as the project progresses.”

“EPA’s WIFIA loan will serve as a low-cost, flexible funding source that better enables the project developers to move forward on building permanent flood protection in the Red River Valley, while reducing costs to local taxpayers,” said U.S. Senator John Hoeven. “We worked hard to ensure WIFIA was available for this critical flood control project, and we welcome this important milestone today.”

The Fargo-Moorhead Metropolitan Area Stormwater Diversion Channel Project includes two components to manage uncontrolled stormwater that can affect the metro area. The stormwater diversion channel component includes the construction of a 30-mile channel to re-direct and temporarily store surplus stormwater flows safely away from the metropolitan area. The in-town levee project includes modifications to 13 levees and 27 stormwater lift stations in the Cities of Fargo, North Dakota and Moorhead, Minnesota. By managing the flow of spring snow melt and summer stormwater, the project will protect 245,000 residents from flooding risks.

The Metro Flood Diversion Authority (MFDA) employed an innovative procurement approach to advance this important project by utilizing a public-private partnership (P3) model. WIFIA’s flexible loan repayment features were key in facilitating the P3 structure. This project will cost $1.3 billion and EPA’s WIFIA loan will finance nearly half of that figure. The remaining project costs will be funded by a combination of an $81 million North Dakota Clean Water State Revolving Fund loan, and over $650 million in private financing. Project construction and operation are expected to create an estimated 4,000 jobs.

“The WIFIA Loan we finalized today is an essential element of our effort. The way it is structured is a major benefit to regional taxpayers and a boost to our economy, adding benefits that extend beyond removing the ongoing stormwater threat from spring storms that coincide with early or excessive snow melt,” said MFDA Chair and Moorhead Mayor Shelly Carlson.

“This is a real job creator for our regional economy, particularly for us in Fargo and Cass County,” added MFDA Vice Chair and Cass County Commissioner Chad Peterson.

“This very important project illustrates that communities across our nation face unique challenges with respect to water infrastructure needs—from climate risks, to lead in drinking water, to wastewater management,” said Darcy O’Connor, Senior Advisor to EPA’s Acting Region 8 Administrator. “EPA is proud to support Fargo-Moorhead by providing financing that will save the community an estimated $438 million throughout the life of the loan.”

EPA’s WIFIA loan for the Fargo-Moorhead Metropolitan Area Stormwater Diversion Channel Project was announced at an event with North Dakota Governor Doug Burgum; U.S. Senator John Hoeven; Darcy O’Connor, Senior Advisor to EPA’s Acting Region 8 Administrator; and additional distinguished guests. With this WIFIA loan closing, EPA has announced 52 WIFIA loans that are providing nearly $10.5 billion in credit assistance to help finance more than $23 billion for water infrastructure while creating approximately 54,000 jobs and saving ratepayers nearly $4.5 billion.

Background on WIFIA
Established by the Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act of 2014, the WIFIA program is a federal loan and guarantee program administered by EPA. WIFIA’s aim is to accelerate investment in the nation’s water infrastructure by providing long-term, low-cost supplemental credit assistance for regionally and nationally significant projects. The WIFIA program has an active pipeline of pending applications for projects that will result in billions of dollars in water infrastructure investment and thousands of jobs.

EPA is accepting Letters of Interest for FY 2021 until July 23, 2021. Approximately $6.5 billion in financing is available. For more information about the FY 2021 selection process, visit: https://www.epa.gov/wifia/wifia-funding-currently-available .

For more information about the WIFIA program’s accomplishments through 2020, visit: https://www.epa.gov/wifia/wifia-annual-report .

For more information about the WIFIA program, visit: https://www.epa.gov/wifia .

SPC Tornado Watch 285

Source: US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Note:  The expiration time in the watch graphic is amended if the watch is replaced, cancelled or extended.Note: Click for Watch Status Reports.
SEL5

URGENT – IMMEDIATE BROADCAST REQUESTED
Tornado Watch Number 285
NWS Storm Prediction Center Norman OK
935 AM CDT Sat Jun 19 2021

The NWS Storm Prediction Center has issued a

* Tornado Watch for portions of
Southeast Alabama
Florida Panhandle
Southwest Georgia
Coastal Waters

* Effective this Saturday morning and evening from 935 AM until
700 PM CDT.

* Primary threats include…
A few tornadoes possible
Isolated damaging wind gusts to 70 mph possible

SUMMARY…Scattered thunderstorms associated with Tropical Storm
Claudette will pose a risk of brief tornadoes and damaging winds
through the afternoon across the watch area.

The tornado watch area is approximately along and 60 statute miles
east and west of a line from 10 miles east of Auburn AL to 45 miles
southwest of Panama City FL. For a complete depiction of the watch
see the associated watch outline update (WOUS64 KWNS WOU5).

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS…

REMEMBER…A Tornado Watch means conditions are favorable for
tornadoes and severe thunderstorms in and close to the watch
area. Persons in these areas should be on the lookout for
threatening weather conditions and listen for later statements
and possible warnings.

&&

OTHER WATCH INFORMATION…CONTINUE…WW 284…

AVIATION…Tornadoes and a few severe thunderstorms with hail
surface and aloft to 0.5 inches. Extreme turbulence and surface wind
gusts to 60 knots. A few cumulonimbi with maximum tops to 500. Mean
storm motion vector 18035.

…Hart

Note: The Aviation Watch (SAW) product is an approximation to the watch area. The actual watch is depicted by the shaded areas.
SAW5
WW 285 TORNADO AL FL GA CW 191435Z – 200000Z
AXIS..60 STATUTE MILES EAST AND WEST OF LINE..
10E AUO/AUBURN AL/ – 45SW PFN/PANAMA CITY FL/
..AVIATION COORDS.. 50NM E/W /27S LGC – 69SSE CEW/
HAIL SURFACE AND ALOFT..0.5 INCH. WIND GUSTS..60 KNOTS.
MAX TOPS TO 500. MEAN STORM MOTION VECTOR 18035.

LAT…LON 32618423 29758521 29758721 32618629

THIS IS AN APPROXIMATION TO THE WATCH AREA. FOR A
COMPLETE DEPICTION OF THE WATCH SEE WOUS64 KWNS
FOR WOU5.

Watch 285 Status Report Messages:

STATUS REPORT #1 ON WW 285

VALID 191445Z – 191600Z

THE SEVERE WEATHER THREAT CONTINUES ACROSS THE ENTIRE WATCH AREA.

..SMITH..06/19/21

ATTN…WFO…BMX…MOB…TAE…FFC…

&&

STATUS REPORT FOR WT 285

SEVERE WEATHER THREAT CONTINUES FOR THE FOLLOWING AREAS

ALC005-011-013-031-039-041-045-061-067-069-081-085-087-101-109-
113-191600-

AL
. ALABAMA COUNTIES INCLUDED ARE

BARBOUR BULLOCK BUTLER
COFFEE COVINGTON CRENSHAW
DALE GENEVA HENRY
HOUSTON LEE LOWNDES
MACON MONTGOMERY PIKE
RUSSELL
$$

FLC005-013-045-059-063-091-131-133-191600-

FL
. FLORIDA COUNTIES INCLUDED ARE

BAY CALHOUN GULF
HOLMES JACKSON OKALOOSA
WALTON WASHINGTON
$$

GAC037-053-061-099-145-193-197-201-215-239-243-249-253-259-261-
263-269-273-307-191600-

GA
. GEORGIA COUNTIES INCLUDED ARE

CALHOUN CHATTAHOOCHEE CLAY
EARLY HARRIS MACON
MARION MILLER MUSCOGEE
QUITMAN RANDOLPH SCHLEY
SEMINOLE STEWART SUMTER
TALBOT TAYLOR TERRELL
WEBSTER
$$

GMZ633-634-635-636-655-750-752-770-772-191600-

CW

. ADJACENT COASTAL WATERS INCLUDED ARE

PERDIDO BAY AREA

PENSACOLA BAY AREA INCLUDING SANTA ROSA SOUND

WESTERN CHOCTAWHATCHEE BAY

EASTERN CHOCTAWHATCHEE BAY

COASTAL WATERS FROM OKALOOSA-WALTON COUNTY LINE TO PENSACOLA FL
OUT 20 NM

COASTAL WATERS FROM OKALOOSA-WALTON COUNTY LINE TO MEXICO BEACH
OUT 20 NM

COASTAL WATERS FROM MEXICO BEACH TO APALACHICOLA OUT 20 NM

WATERS FROM OKALOOSA-WALTON COUNTY LINE TO MEXICO BEACH FROM 20
TO 60 NM

WATERS FROM MEXICO BEACH TO APALACHICOLA FL FROM 20 TO 60 NM

$$
THE WATCH STATUS MESSAGE IS FOR GUIDANCE PURPOSES ONLY. PLEASE
REFER TO WATCH COUNTY NOTIFICATION STATEMENTS FOR OFFICIAL
INFORMATION ON COUNTIES…INDEPENDENT CITIES AND MARINE ZONES
CLEARED FROM SEVERE THUNDERSTORM AND TORNADO WATCHES.
$$

Note:  Click for Complete Product Text.TornadoesProbability of 2 or more tornadoes

Mod (50%)

Probability of 1 or more strong (EF2-EF5) tornadoes

Low (20%)

WindProbability of 10 or more severe wind events

Low (20%)

Probability of 1 or more wind events > 65 knots

Low (10%)

HailProbability of 10 or more severe hail events

Low ( 2 inches

Low (

Ebola Outbreak in Guinea Declared Over

Source: US Gov Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CDC works 24/7 saving lives, protecting people from health threats, and saving money to have a more secure nation. A US federal agency, CDC helps make the healthy choice the easy choice by putting science and prevention into action. CDC works to help people live longer, healthier and more productive lives.

A Holiday We Can All Celebrate

Source: US GOIAM Union

Dear Sisters and Brothers,

As a Texas native, Juneteenth means more to me than just a day to mark the end of a horrific period in our history, the institution of slavery. It’s also a day when Texans gathered for food and drinks with family and friends to celebrate the end of a painful period in our nation’s history.

Juneteenth celebrations spread across Texas and cities throughout America. In Texas, it became a state holiday in 1980. Now, with the passage of legislation establishing Juneteenth as a federal holiday, all Americans can join together as one nation to celebrate the end of slavery in the United States.

The Machinists Union’s commitment to inclusion and diversity runs deep. It is critical that we be there for one another as the nation continues to struggle to unite against racism.

Today, I ask that you honor the pain caused by slavery and the lives lost. This is an opportunity to continue learning, connecting with each other, and reflecting on how we can move forward and achieve permanent and lasting change.

I am humbled to be part of this beautifully diverse and inclusive union. Together, supporting one another, we will continue to move forward during these difficult times.

In solidarity,

 

Robert Martinez Jr.
IAM International President

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