CPSC Awards More than $1.3 Million in Pool Safely Grants to Five State and Local Governments to Combat Pool and Spa Drownings and Drain Entrapments

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

Release Date: December 23, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) Chair Alexander Hoehn-Saric and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (FL-23) announced today five awardees of a grant program aimed at preventing pool and spa drownings, as well as drain entrapments. The state and local governments were selected by CPSC to receive more than $1.3 million in Pool Safely Grant Program (PSGP) grant funds.  This funding will provide state and local governments with assistance for education, training, and enforcement of pool safety requirements that are intended to save lives and prevent serious injuries. 
FY 2022 Pool Safely Grant Program Awards

Jurisdictions

      State

Award Amount

Florida Department of Health

Florida

$363,749

Virginia Department Of
Health

Virginia

$51,850

County of Stanislaus

California

$320,000

County of Los Angeles

California

$400,000

County of Tulare

California

$173,095.92

“Drowning remains the number one cause of death for children ages one to four,” said CPSC Chair Alexander Hoehn-Saric. “These grant funds are an essential element in our work to protect children, by providing lifesaving safety information to communities, and helping these communities enforce pool safety requirements.” 
“I have long been a passionate advocate for pool and spa safety, and that will not stop.  We must do more to stop these preventable tragedies, and these grants are one of the key steps we can take to help save more children’s lives,” said Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz. “My goal is to reduce child drownings across the country, and we can do it by teaching children to swim, ensuring pools have the right safety equipment, and educating parents on the critical importance of supervising children in and near the water.”
The Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act (VGB Act), which Rep. Wasserman Schultz authored and led, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President George W. Bush in December 2007. The VGB Act authorizes the PSGP, which provides state and local governments with assistance for education, training, and enforcement of pool safety requirements.
CPSC’s website www.PoolSafely.gov has more information on the Pool Safely Grant program and the VGB Act as well as free, downloadable educational materials available to the public.

Release Number
22-041

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products has contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.
Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.
For lifesaving information:

SaferProducts.gov

The link you selected is for a destination outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and cannot attest to the accuracy of the information it contains. You may wish to review the privacy policy of the external site as its information collection practices may differ from ours. Linking to this external site does not constitute an endorsement of the site or the information it contains by CPSC or any of its employees.
Click Ok if you wish to continue to the website; otherwise, click Cancel to return to our site.

CPSC Launches New Online Tool to Make it Easier for Businesses to Report Hazards and to Protect Consumers; Mandatory for Fast Track Program in January 2022

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

WASHINGTON, D.C. –Firms are required to report to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) potentially hazardous products that they manufacture, distribute, import or sell. To encourage more online reporting of these potential hazards, CPSC will require firms to use a new, upgraded online reporting system for Fast Track recalls. 
“Our goal is to protect consumers, by identifying and removing hazardous products from the marketplace more quickly, and by streamlining the recall process,” said CPSC Chair Alex Hoehn-Saric.  “We are extremely proud of the hard work that CPSC staff put into creating this new tool to facilitate online reporting.”
CPSC’s Fast Track program helps consumers by removing hazardous products from the marketplace quickly, and it rewards businesses that act swiftly to implement corrective action. 
The updated Section 15(b) reporting system for companies, now available at www.saferproducts.gov/business, has a user-friendly interface that includes hover-over features and guidance for firms to navigate the submission process.  Firms using the new site will also receive an emailed copy of all information submitted to CPSC through the system, along with emailed case updates, deadline reminders and contact information for the CPSC staff handling their report.
This system is also mobile-friendly, so users can now submit reports and provide attachments via their smart phones or tablets.  Businesses that participate in the Fast Track program will also be able to review and approve a system-generated draft recall press release before submitting their report, to help expedite the overall recall process.  
Effective January 31, 2022, businesses that want to participate in the Fast Track program will be required to submit their Section 15(b) reports exclusively online through the portal.  Reports received via email, fax, or mail for participation in a Fast Track recall will be rejected after this date, and the firms will be directed to resubmit their reports via the online system.
Although many of the new system features, and its mandatory use, apply specifically to Fast Track recalls, non-Fast Track filers are strongly encouraged to use the updated online system, as well. Users can easily file an initial report and can submit additional information and documents, if desired, using the system. 
Visit the Fast Track information page to see how the new system can benefit companies  considering a recall. 
The new online business portal for the Fast Track Program can be found at www.saferproducts.gov/business 

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products has contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.
Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.
For lifesaving information:

CPSC Issues Life-Saving Tips to Millions Left Without Power After Deadly Tornadoes Rip Through Multiple States

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

Release Date: December 14, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is aware of the vast devastation caused by the deadly tornadoes that swept through multiple states over the weekend. As affected communities endure power losses, the CPSC urges consumers to take steps to prevent further harm, and reminds them to protect themselves against carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning and fires. 
Loss of Power—Using a Generator Safely
Consumers need to be especially careful during a loss of electrical power.  Many use portable generators and other devices for sources of power and heat, exposing themselves to increased risk of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning and fire. Consumers who plan to use a portable generator in the case of a power loss should follow these tips:
Always operate portable generators outside, at least 20 feet away from the house, and direct the generator’s exhaust away from the home and any other buildings that someone could enter.   
Never operate a portable generator inside a home, garage, basement, crawlspace, shed or on a porch. Opening doors or windows will not provide enough ventilation to prevent the buildup of lethal levels of CO.  
Check that portable generators have had proper maintenance, and read and follow the labels, instructions, and warnings on the generator and in the owner’s manual. 
CPSC urges consumers to look for and ask retailers for a portable generator equipped with a safety feature to shut off automatically when high CO concentrations are present around the generator.  Some models with CO shut-off also have reduced emissions; consumers should look for those models, as well. These models may or may not be advertised as certified to the latest safety standards for portable generators – PGMA G300-2018 and UL 2201.
Poisonous carbon monoxide from a portable generator can kill in minutes. CO is an invisible killer. It’s colorless and odorless. From 2010-2020, CPSC estimates that more than 700 people died from CO poisoning associated with generators, over 50 in 2020. CO poisoning from portable generators can happen so quickly that exposed persons may become unconscious before recognizing the symptoms of nausea, dizziness, or weakness.
 To help avoid carbon monoxide poisoning:
Install battery-operated CO alarms or CO alarms with battery backup at home, outside separate sleeping areas, and on each floor of the home. 
Make sure CO alarms at home are working properly, by pressing the test button and replacing batteries, if needed. Never ignore a carbon monoxide alarm when it sounds. Get outside immediately. Then call 911.
  
Dangers from Charcoal and Candles
Never use charcoal indoors. Burning charcoal in an enclosed space can produce lethal levels of carbon monoxide. Do not cook on a charcoal grill in a garage, even with the door open. 
Use caution when burning candles. Use flashlights instead. If using candles, do not burn them on or near anything that can catch fire. Never leave burning candles unattended. Extinguish candles when leaving the room and before sleeping. 
Make sure smoke alarms are installed on every level of the house and inside each bedroom. Never ignore a ringing smoke alarm. Get outside immediately. Call 911.
CPSC resources:
Carbon Monoxide Safety Center
Links to broadcast quality video for media: 
Tornado Safety b-roll: https://spaces.hightail.com/space/oy0kSjsyzz 
For more information, contact Nicolette Nye at: nnye@cpsc.gov, or at: 240-204-4410.

Release Number
22-031

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products has contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.
Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.
For lifesaving information:

SaferProducts.gov

The link you selected is for a destination outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and cannot attest to the accuracy of the information it contains. You may wish to review the privacy policy of the external site as its information collection practices may differ from ours. Linking to this external site does not constitute an endorsement of the site or the information it contains by CPSC or any of its employees.
Click Ok if you wish to continue to the website; otherwise, click Cancel to return to our site.

Seasons Change, but Fire and Carbon Monoxide Safety Is Year-Round; Warm Up to CPSC’s Tips for Staying Safe During Colder Weather

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

WASHINGTON, D.C. –  The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is warning consumers to be vigilant about fire and carbon monoxide (CO) hazards in the colder winter months ahead. The dangers, although present across all populations, disproportionally affect certain communities.According to CPSC’s Residential Fire Loss Estimates report, African Americans have the highest rate of fire deaths, nearly twice the overall rate across the population. In addition, African Americans represent 22 percent of portable generator-related CO deaths, nearly 170 from 2010-2020. 
Space Heaters
This is the time of year when consumers may get out the space heaters for extra warmth. Make sure to keep flammable materials at least three feet away. Always plug space heaters directly into a wall outlet and never into a power strip, to prevent overloading and causing a fire.
CPSC estimates that portable heaters are involved in about 1,700 fires per year, resulting in about 80 deaths and 160 injuries annually.
A CPSC staff report found that space heaters can also present a hyperthermia (overheating) hazard to consumers, particularly children, people with disabilities and senior citizens, who may be more susceptible because of their limited ability to act or react to the elevated ambient temperature.
Hyperthermia can result in death. DO NOT leave space heaters running unattended in a confined space around infants, or individuals with reduced physical, sensory or mental capabilities.  
Smoke and CO Alarms
Working smoke and CO alarms save lives! Install smoke alarms on every level of the home and inside each bedroom. CO alarms should be placed on every level of home outside sleeping areas.
Test the alarms every month to make sure they are working. Replace batteries at least once every year, or install smoke and CO alarms with sealed, 10-year batteries.  
Furnaces, Fireplaces and Chimneys
Start by having fireplace flues and chimneys and other fuel-burning appliances, such as furnaces, inspected by a professional before the heating season.   
Generators
Most CO deaths associated with portable generators occur in the colder months of the year, between November and February. The exhaust contains poisonous carbon monoxide, which can kill in minutes. Use portable generators outside only and place them at least 20 feet from the home. Never use a generator inside a home, basement, shed or garage.
From 2010-2020, CPSC estimates that more than 700 people died from CO poisoning associated with generators, over 50 in 2020. 
Use flashlights instead of candles
If you experience a power outage, use battery-powered flashlights or lanterns, rather than candles, to light the home. If using candles, never leave burning candles unattended. 
Check for recalled products
Recalls are year-round too. Before using household products as the colder weather arrives, check to see if the products have been recalled at www.cpsc.gov/recalls. If a product has been recalled, stop using it immediately and contact the recalling company. 
COVID-19 Safety Checklist
As the seasons change and people spend more time indoors, CPSC urges the public to review our COVID-19 Safety Checklist for more fire and CO safety tips and other important information.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products has contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.
Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.
For lifesaving information:

Making a List, Checking it Twice: Tips for Celebrating Safely this Holiday Season

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

New CPSC data highlights holiday-related risks, including unsafe toys, decorations and cooking fires
WASHINGTON, D.C. – As people nationwide prepare to celebrate the holidays, new data from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) highlights the importance of taking safety precautions to avoid potential dangers associated with common holiday products and traditions. 
“Whether you’re shopping for gifts online or gathering for in-person or virtual holiday celebrations, it is important that everyone takes steps to keep holiday festivities safer,” said CPSC Chair Alexander Hoehn-Saric. “Avoid a visit to the emergency-room this holiday season by following some simple safety guidelines.”
Unsafe toys, cooking fires, decorating, holiday trees and candles lead to thousands of injuries and deaths each year. People can celebrate more safely this holiday season by making a list of safety precautions and checking it twice. Here are the latest data and safety tips from CPSC:
TOYS 
Toy manufacturers and retailers are facing both supply-chain delays and global shipping issues, prompting concerns about a possible toy shortage. This could lead consumers to scramble to buy products wherever they can find them, and create room for unscrupulous sellers to sell dangerous or counterfeit products.  
Toy-related injuries and deaths continue to impact thousands of children in the United States each year: CPSC reports that in 2020, there were nearly 150,000 toy-related, emergency department-treated injuries and nine deaths among children ages 14 and younger, with most of these deaths associated with choking on small parts of toys.
Nonmotorized scooters account for 21 percent of all toy-related, emergency department-treated injuries: The number of injuries increased 17 percent in fiscal year 2021, from 35,600 scooter injuries reported in 2020, to 41,700 injuries reported in 2021. 
COOKING 
As people cook Thanksgiving Dinner, bake holiday treats, and share meals with family and friends, it is important to take safety precautions to avoid dangerous residential fires.
Cooking fires remain the # 1 cause of residential fires. CPSC data show that there are about 360,000 home fires every year, leading to about 2,400 deaths and nearly 10,400 injuries each year. 
An average of 1,700 cooking fires occur on Thanksgiving Day each year, more than three times the average number of cooking fires on any other day of the year. 
Turkey fryers create particular risks. Since 1998, CPSC is aware of 222 fire or scald/burn incidents involving turkey fryers, resulting in 83 injuries and $9.7 million in property loss.
DECORATING 
Holiday decorations and celebrations are an annual tradition for many families. However, dry Christmas trees, burning candles, and holiday lights can pose a real hazard if not used and maintained properly. 
On average, there are about 160 decorating-related injuries each day during the holiday season, with almost half of the incidents involving falls. In the 2019 holiday season, about 14,800 people were treated in emergency rooms due to holiday decorating-related injuries. In the 2019 holiday season, there have been no deaths associated with seasonal decorations.
Dry Christmas trees and unattended candles can lead to dangerous fires. From 2016 to 2018, there were about 100 Christmas tree fires and about 1,100 candle fires in November and December each year, resulting in 30 deaths, 180 injuries, and nearly $56 million in property loss per year. 
Follow these CPSC safety tips to keep your family safe this holiday season: 
Toys:
Follow age guidance and other safety information on the toy packaging and choose toys that match each child’s interests and abilities.
Get safety gear, including helmets, for scooters and other riding toys – and make sure that children use them every time. 
Keep small balls and toys with small parts away from children younger than age 3 and keep deflated balloons away from children younger than age 8. 
Online Shopping:
Online shopping for toys or other products continues to be a popular and convenient alternative to visiting brick and mortar stores, but particularly in a time of potential toy shortages, it is important that people follow these safety tips: 
Always buy from stores and online retailers you know and trust.
To avoid counterfeits, scrutinize the product, the packaging, and the label. If the price seems too good to be true, this could be a sign that the product is counterfeit.
Look for a certification mark from an independent testing organization and the manufacturer’s label on electrical products.
Cooking: 
Never leave cooking food unattended on the stove.
Only fry a turkey outside and away from your home. 
Holiday Decorating:
Make sure your live Christmas tree has plenty of water and look for the “Fire Resistant” label when buying an artificial tree.
Place burning candles in sight, away from flammable items, and blow them out before leaving the room.
Visit CPSC’s Holiday Safety Information Center for more holiday safety tips, as well as a sharable Holiday Safety video, poster, and b-roll that simulates the serious risks posed by using a turkey fryer too close to the home, a dry Christmas tree, and burning candles near flammable items.   

It’s About Time to Change Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarm Batteries; Daylight Saving Time Reminder

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

Release Date: November 01, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday, November 7, 2021, and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommends marking the time change by replacing the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide (CO) alarms. With people spending more time at home during the COVID-19 pandemic, causing furnaces, fireplaces, and other fuel-burning appliances to put in extra work, working smoke and CO alarms have never been more important.  
CPSC estimates an annual average of 362,000 unintentional residential fires, resulting in approximately 2,400 deaths, 10,400 injuries and $7 billion in property losses from 2016 through 2018.
Carbon monoxide is called the invisible killer, because you cannot see or smell it. Carbon monoxide poisoning can come from portable generators, home heating systems and other CO-producing appliances. The majority of CO deaths occur in the colder months of the year between November and February. 
More than 400 people die every year of CO poisoning, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 
After replacing the batteries this year, check alarms every month to make sure they are working. Better yet, install alarms with 10-year sealed batteries that don’t need replacing for a decade. Create a fire escape plan, including two ways out of every room, and practice it. Check your home for other hidden hazards, using CPSC’s COVID-19 safety checklist.

Release Number
22-014

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products has contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.
Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.
For lifesaving information:

SaferProducts.gov

The link you selected is for a destination outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and cannot attest to the accuracy of the information it contains. You may wish to review the privacy policy of the external site as its information collection practices may differ from ours. Linking to this external site does not constitute an endorsement of the site or the information it contains by CPSC or any of its employees.
Click Ok if you wish to continue to the website; otherwise, click Cancel to return to our site.

On a Day for Goblins and Tricks, Make Safety a Treat

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is reminding consumers to make safety a priority this Halloween when trick-or-treating, donning costumes, carving pumpkins and decorating.
Over the past three years, CPSC estimates that an annual average 3,600 Halloween-related injuries were treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments. Here’s how the injuries break down:
48% were related to pumpkin carving;
27% were due to falls while putting up or taking down decorations, tripping on costumes or walking while trick-or-treating;
25% of the injuries included lacerations, ingestions and other injuries associated with costumes, pumpkins or decorations, and allergic reactions or rashes. 
Among the injured, 56 percent were adults 18 years and over, 44 percent were under 18 years old, and about six percent of all injuries were to children two years old or younger. 
Avoid injuries by following these CPSC safety tips:
Leave pumpkin carving to the adults. Child helpers can grab a spoon and scoop out the inside or use a marker to trace the design. 
Battery-operated lights or glow sticks are recommended for decorations and are the safest option. However, if using open-flame candles, keep them away from curtains, decorations and other combustibles that could catch fire. Never leave burning candles unattended.
Use a ladder when hanging or removing decorations, and only use lights that have been tested for safety by a recognized testing laboratory. Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires or loose connections. Discard damaged light sets.
Wear a costume that fits, and avoid overly long or baggy costumes to prevent trips and falls. Costumes with loose, flowing fabrics can also be a fire hazard when close to open flames. Costumes made of polyester or nylon fabric, and not sheer cotton or rayon fabric, reduce the hazard. However, any fabric can burn if it comes in contact with an open flame.
One last thing, be sure to follow the advice of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and your local jurisdiction. COVID-19 still lurks, so know when to wear a mask, not a Halloween costume mask, but a protective mask.
Have a safe and happy Halloween!

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products has contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.
Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.
For lifesaving information:

CPSC to Consumers: The Safest Window Coverings When Young Children Are Present Are Cordless

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

English
Español

Release Date: October 05, 2021

October is National Window Covering Safety Month

WASHINGTON, D.C. – One of the most serious hazards in American homes is also one of its most hidden—window covering cords that entangle infants and children. As many across the country continue to work and learn from home due to COVID-19, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) urges consumers to choose cordless window coverings. Pull cords, continuous loop cords, inner cords or any other accessible cords on window coverings are dangerous to young children.
“Children have strangled to death on the cords of window blinds, shades, draperies and other window coverings, and this can happen in mere moments, even with an adult nearby,” said CPSC Acting Chairman Robert Adler. “The safest option when young children are present is to go cordless.”
When children become entangled, strangulation can occur in less than a minute. Window cord strangulation is often silent, so parents or caregivers nearby may not realize that a tragedy is unfolding. On average, about nine children age 5 and younger die every year from strangulation in window blinds, shades, draperies and other window coverings with cords. In addition, there were nearly 200 incidents involving children up to 8 years old due to strangulation hazards on window covering cords from January 2009 through December 2020, according to CPSC data. Injuries varied from a scar around the neck, quadriplegia and permanent brain damage.
CPSC is advising consumers to buy and install cordless window coverings (labeled as cordless) in all rooms where a child may be present. Cordless products are available at most major retailers and online including inexpensive options. If consumers are unable to replace existing window coverings with cordless ones, CPSC recommends the following safety steps:
Eliminate any dangling cords by making the pull cords as short as possible.
Keep all window covering cords out of the reach of children.
Ensure that cord stops are installed properly and adjusted to limit the movement of inner lift cords.
Anchor to the floor or wall continuous-loop cords for draperies and blinds.
Move all cribs, beds, furniture and toys away from windows and window covering cords, preferably to another wall.
For more information, visit CPSC’s Window Covering Safety Education Center. 
CPSC staff is in the process of developing a draft Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPR) on corded window coverings for Commission consideration.

Release Number
22-002

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products has contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.
Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.
For lifesaving information:

SaferProducts.gov

The link you selected is for a destination outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and cannot attest to the accuracy of the information it contains. You may wish to review the privacy policy of the external site as its information collection practices may differ from ours. Linking to this external site does not constitute an endorsement of the site or the information it contains by CPSC or any of its employees.
Click Ok if you wish to continue to the website; otherwise, click Cancel to return to our site.

Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety to Avoid Danger; African Americans Have the Highest Rate of Fire Deaths and Injuries

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

Release Date: October 04, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Knowing what to do if there’s a house fire can save lives. Fire Prevention Week is October 3 through 9, and CPSC and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) want to encourage everyone to listen to the sounds of safety from smoke and CO alarms. That means:
When the alarm “beeps,” respond immediately and get out of the home as quickly as possible.
When the alarm “chirps,” it’s time to change the batteries, or install a new alarm.
If there is someone in the household who is deaf or hard of hearing, install bed shaker and strobe light alarms that will alert that person to fire danger.
Based on CPSC staff estimates for 2016 through 2018, there are about 360,000 home fires every year, leading to roughly 2,400 deaths. In addition, it is estimated that there are nearly 10,400 injuries per year. Research also shows that across all races, African Americans have the highest rate of fire deaths and injuries—nearly twice the overall death rate, and more than twice the overall injury rate. According to CPSC’s Residential Fire Loss Estimates report, although African Americans represent 13% of the population, they represent an estimated 24% of the home fire deaths and 27% of the home fire injuries.
“In light of this data, we must do better collectively, at state and local levels, to inform the public—and African Americans, in particular–about lifesaving, fire safety messaging,” says Acting CPSC Chairman Bob Adler. “One way to do this is to encourage local community leadership to implement outreach strategies that both communicate and encourage proactively these fire safety guidelines at home.”
CPSC urges everyone to plan and practice regularly these simple steps to have a fighting chance at avoiding injury and death when faced with a fire emergency.
Create an escape plan. Make sure there are two ways out of each room, as well as a path to the outside from each exit.
Make sure everyone in the home knows the plan and practices the plan.
Pick a family meeting place outside.
Once outside, stay outside.
Call 911.
Ensure that working smoke alarms are inside and outside of every sleeping area and on every level of the home.
Make sure there are working CO alarms on every level of the home.
Test all smoke and CO alarms monthly.
Have working fire sprinklers.
Small children in the home, and the elderly will need additional assistance during a fire emergency. For more information, check out our multigenerational tool kit.
View CPSC’s fire safety PSA for older consumers here.
More fire safety tips and information are provided in our fire safety information center.

Release Number
22-001

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products has contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.
Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.
For lifesaving information:

SaferProducts.gov

The link you selected is for a destination outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and cannot attest to the accuracy of the information it contains. You may wish to review the privacy policy of the external site as its information collection practices may differ from ours. Linking to this external site does not constitute an endorsement of the site or the information it contains by CPSC or any of its employees.
Click Ok if you wish to continue to the website; otherwise, click Cancel to return to our site.

Injuries Using E-Scooters, E-Bikes and Hoverboards Jump 70% During the Past Four Years

Source: US Consumer Product Safety Commission

Release Date: September 30, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. – As consumers step up their use of e-scooters, hoverboards, and e-bikes to return to work, school and other activities, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reminds everyone to keep safety a priority.
According to advance data from a soon-to-be-released CPSC report on hazard patterns associated with micromobility products, injuries and deaths continue to rise, but data are certainly consistent with the notion that a lot of people staying home in 2020, led to a leveling off or slight reduction in scooter use.
Here’s what the latest data show:
There were more than 190,000 emergency room (ED) visits due to all micromobility products from 2017 through 2020.  ED visits had a steady 70% increase from 34,000 (2017), 44,000 (2018), 54,800 (2019) to 57,800 (2020).
Much of the increase between 2017 and later years was attributable to ED visits involving e-scooters, which rose three times as much, from 7,700 (2017), to 14,500 (2018), to 27,700 (2019) and 25,400 (2020).
Injuries happened most frequently to upper and lower limbs, as well as the head and the neck.
CPSC is aware of 71 fatalities associated with micromobility products from 2017 through 2020, although reporting is incomplete.
The hazards associated with micromobility products primarily fall into three broad areas: mechanical, electrical, and human factors. To address these hazards, CPSC staff continues to work with ASTM International and Underwriters Laboratories (UL) to develop and make improvements to, voluntary standards. In support of these and other efforts, CPSC has done analyses of incident data and has done testing for the various hazards. CPSC also collaborates with federal partners and industry stakeholders to promote micromobility safety.
The best way to avoid injuries when using micromobility products: 
Always make sure to wear a helmet. 
Before riding an e-scooter, make sure to check it for any damage, which includes examining the handlebars, brakes, throttle, bell, lights, tires, cables and frame. Damage to the e-scooter can cause loss of control and lead to a crash. 
More life-saving tips can be found in CPSC’s e-scooter safety alert and safety PSA.

Release Number
21-205

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products has contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.
Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.
For lifesaving information:

SaferProducts.gov

The link you selected is for a destination outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and cannot attest to the accuracy of the information it contains. You may wish to review the privacy policy of the external site as its information collection practices may differ from ours. Linking to this external site does not constitute an endorsement of the site or the information it contains by CPSC or any of its employees.
Click Ok if you wish to continue to the website; otherwise, click Cancel to return to our site.